Ephinea Cooking Thread

Harborer of Hope

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I WANT AN ANSWER TO THAT QUESTION!!!
Heheheh...well for one....Mew is slowly developing some kinda difficulty swallowing ANY meat that's over cooked...it's common in Stroke victims sadly. And Anyone who's eaten at a Japanese steakhouse can tell you...Medium rare fillet mignon is SUPER SOFT and Juuuuuicy! Overcooked steak for mew is not only dangerous but just..."Blech!" lol Sowwy! <3!
 

Spaghetti O's

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Heheheh...well for one....Mew is slowly developing some kinda difficulty swallowing ANY meat that's over cooked...it's common in Stroke victims sadly. And Anyone who's eaten at a Japanese steakhouse can tell you...Medium rare fillet mignon is SUPER SOFT and Juuuuuicy! Overcooked steak for mew is not only dangerous but just..."Blech!" lol Sowwy! <3!
Yes but my dad often cooks medium rare because my mother likes it and often it tastes raw and bloody!
 

cameron-

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-well done steaks are tougher and drier and chewier (caveats for the last bit since a lot of steaks are chewy if undercooked too-- a lot of people dont understand for instance that you probably don't want, say, a hangar steak cooked rare or blue)
-a lot of the fat renders and cooks out, this is a huge deal when you're spending top dollar for that pastured marble quality.
-any particular quality of the steak gets rubbed out when you overcook it. If it's dry aged you'll lose a lot of that cheesy/nutty/acrid funk. if it's grass fed you'll lose a lot of the meat's gamey qualities.


people don't like rare meats generally because they still look like flesh. but if you buy or order a steak you're deliberately opting to eat flesh so might as well sack up and confront it. (americans are also terrified of eating raw or undercooked animal products because they think they will get sick. you can eat almost anything raw safely and comfortably as long as you don't pull it out of the garbage or the back of a SYSCO truck. I'm more afraid of eating leafy greens in this country than I am beef tartare)

all livestock is bled long before you encounter it as a consumer. you will never find blood leaking out of your steak. (that said blood is a wonderful ingredient and nothing to be afraid of)

beef is also terrible for the environment so if you're going to eat it you may as well respect the product. If you just want to eat brown meat chips we have plant based substitutes for that these days.
 
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Harborer of Hope

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Yes but my dad often cooks medium rare because my mother likes it and often it tastes raw and bloody!
Little bloody is Fine with THIS kitty~! Or as mew likes to call it at the hibachi...."still mooing!". XD! GRISTLE and or globs of Fat as thick as your thumb mew can't stand for some reason.
 

Harborer of Hope

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-well done steaks are tougher and drier and chewier (caveats for the last bit since a lot of steaks are chewy if undercooked too-- a lot of people dont understand for instance that you probably don't want, say, a hangar steak cooked rare or blue)
-a lot of the fat renders and cooks out, this is a huge deal when you're spending top dollar for that pastured marble quality.
-any particular quality of the steak gets rubbed out when you overcook it. If it's dry aged you'll lose a lot of that cheesy/nutty/acrid funk. if it's grass fed you'll lose a lot of the meat's gamey qualities.


people don't like rare meats generally because they still look like flesh. but if you buy or order a steak you're deliberately opting to eat flesh so might as well sack up and confront it. (americans are also terrified of eating raw or undercooked animal products because they think they will get sick. you can eat almost anything raw safely and comfortably as long as you don't pull it out of the garbage or the back of a SYSCO truck. I'm more afraid of eating leafy greens in this country than I am beef tartare)

all livestock is bled long before you encounter it as a consumer. you will never find blood leaking out of your steak. (that said blood is a wonderful ingredient and nothing to be afraid of)

beef is also terrible for the environment so if you're going to eat it you may as well respect the product. If you just want to eat brown meat chips we have plant based substitutes for that these days.
Oooooo Hangar steak....isn't that similar to Flank or Skirt steak??? For a while mew has been caught raving about these Brazillian steakhouse chains....OMFG....The Churrasco is ...ORGASMIC! Never thought there was another steak MOAR Softer than Fillet...crap...now mews drooling just thinking about it...Here's one of mews Fave places!...
This particular restaurant is in the Persian Gulf area....There's a few Miami locations mew Adores!
 
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Zelendria

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Heheheh...well for one....Mew is slowly developing some kinda difficulty swallowing ANY meat that's over cooked...it's common in Stroke victims sadly. And Anyone who's eaten at a Japanese steakhouse can tell you...Medium rare fillet mignon is SUPER SOFT and Juuuuuicy! Overcooked steak for mew is not only dangerous but just..."Blech!" lol Sowwy! <3!
https://goo.gl/maps/Bvsn14qSkK3SMoe59
If only you were in Calgary Mew-San, this VERY LOCAL (3 blocks away) Grill and Sushi place does the most amazing stone grilled Japanese Steak. You would be in heaven. This photo is one of my MOST LIKED photos on my Google Guide profile.
 

Zelendria

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-well done steaks are tougher and drier and chewier (caveats for the last bit since a lot of steaks are chewy if undercooked too-- a lot of people dont understand for instance that you probably don't want, say, a hangar steak cooked rare or blue)
-a lot of the fat renders and cooks out, this is a huge deal when you're spending top dollar for that pastured marble quality.
-any particular quality of the steak gets rubbed out when you overcook it. If it's dry aged you'll lose a lot of that cheesy/nutty/acrid funk. if it's grass fed you'll lose a lot of the meat's gamey qualities.


people don't like rare meats generally because they still look like flesh. but if you buy or order a steak you're deliberately opting to eat flesh so might as well sack up and confront it. (americans are also terrified of eating raw or undercooked animal products because they think they will get sick. you can eat almost anything raw safely and comfortably as long as you don't pull it out of the garbage or the back of a SYSCO truck. I'm more afraid of eating leafy greens in this country than I am beef tartare)

all livestock is bled long before you encounter it as a consumer. you will never find blood leaking out of your steak. (that said blood is a wonderful ingredient and nothing to be afraid of)

beef is also terrible for the environment so if you're going to eat it you may as well respect the product. If you just want to eat brown meat chips we have plant based substitutes for that these days.
Mostly any germs are on the surface of the meat (for beef). For pork and other meats the inside temp is only of concern for parasites. Americans are basically stupid and uneducated. Vietnamese eat raw beef on a regular basis, and its all about ensuring that the cut is "clean" from outside contaminants (i.e. bacteria or contact issues) rather than "raw meat".
 

Harborer of Hope

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https://goo.gl/maps/Bvsn14qSkK3SMoe59
If only you were in Calgary Mew-San, this VERY LOCAL (3 blocks away) Grill and Sushi place does the most amazing stone grilled Japanese Steak. You would be in heaven. This photo is one of my MOST LIKED photos on my Google Guide profile.
THAT is a BEAUTIFUL Spread! Mew had mentioned before, as Cat-like mew is IRL...She's not a big fan of Sushi...=( BUT she Loves kidnapping friends out for their fancy Daimyo Maki rolls etc. But mew settles down for whatever Steak teriyaki they has =3. THAT Steak Does look YUMMY though! <3!
 

Zelendria

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THAT is a BEAUTIFUL Spread! Mew had mentioned before, as Cat-like mew is IRL...She's not a big fan of Sushi...=( BUT she Loves kidnapping friends out for their fancy Daimyo Maki rolls etc. But mew settles down for whatever Steak teriyaki they has =3. THAT Steak Does look YUMMY though! <3!
I will be eating there next week, that's where my daughter wants to have dinner for her birthday!

They even have Kobe Beef. *drools*

I maintain that most people that think they don't like sushi just haven't "met the right type".
I do not love all types of sushi, but many cuts are just amazing and aren't mushy or slimy like people assume.
Chinook Salmon (for example) is really amazing...very few people would think that there's a difference, but its the same as different cuts of steak, the texture varies WIDELY and having truly good, FRESH sushi might change your mind if you try it again. =)
 

kipsauce

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Just tried making Mujadara for the first time. Many mistakes were made, and lessons learned. Regardless of my inexperience, the results are delicious. It was the first time I tried to caramelize onions, and I'll definitely be using yet more onions when I try again. I love the kick I'm getting out of the cayenne pepper, and added green onions. I took two hours to make, but I got a whole bunch of the stuff. I may decide to take some in for lunch at work. =n.n=

I followed this recipe: https://www.connoisseurusveg.com/mujadara/
 

Jyuki

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So, I made up a recipe for a cake and thought I'd share it here. Some ingredient may only be available in Belgium so I'll give alternatives.

Jyuki's apple-ish cake

Ingredients
:
  • 200g Unsweetened Applesauce
  • 125g Unsalted Butter
  • 100g Cassonade Graeffe (Can use brown sugar)
  • 3 Eggs
  • [ 75g Wheat Flour
  • 75g Corn Flour
  • 1/2 Bag of baking powder (around 6g) ] - Mix them together
  • 1 Teaspoon of vanilla extract

Recipe:
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C
  2. Beat the Cassonade (or sugar) with the Butter until it's smooth
  3. Add alternately the Eggs and the sifted mixed flours/baking powder
  4. Add the Applesauce
  5. Add the Vanilla extract
  6. Put the preparation into a buttered cake mold and bake it for approximately 35min (can take longer/less depending on the used mold)
  7. Let it cool down before unmolding.
  8. Profit
 

Harborer of Hope

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So, I made up a recipe for a cake and thought I'd share it here. Some ingredient may only be available in Belgium so I'll give alternatives.

Jyuki's apple-ish cake

Ingredients
:
  • 200g Unsweetened Applesauce
  • 125g Unsalted Butter
  • 100g Cassonade Graeffe (Can use brown sugar)
  • 3 Eggs
  • [ 75g Wheat Flour
  • 75g Corn Flour
  • 1/2 Bag of baking powder (around 6g) ] - Mix them together
  • 1 Teaspoon of vanilla extract

Recipe:
  1. Preheat the oven to 180°C
  2. Beat the Cassonade (or sugar) with the Butter until it's smooth
  3. Add alternately the Eggs and the sifted mixed flours/baking powder
  4. Add the Applesauce
  5. Add the Vanilla extract
  6. Put the preparation into a buttered cake mold and bake it for approximately 35min (can take longer/less depending on the used mold)
  7. Let it cool down before unmolding.
  8. Profit
Youre making mew wanna learn to make COBBLER! <3
 

Jyuki

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I made some "sablé" cookies the other day, they were pretty darn good. So I thought I'd share the recipe here.

Sablé cookie (translated to shortbread), for around 24 pcs:

Ingredients:

150g
T55 Flour
75g butter (should not be too hard nor soft)
75g brown sugar
1 small egg
1 pinch of salt
Any extract/flavors you want (vanilla, lemon, cinnamon), I went with vanilla extract

Tips: The dough must not stick. If it's too sticky, feel free to add more flour until it's smooth. It could happen if the egg was too big or if you added a liquid aroma.

Recipe:
  1. mix the flour, sugar, salt and butter (and any powdered aroma) and work it with your hands. Everything must be well mixed (texture is like sand)
  2. Add the egg (and any liquid aroma) and mix well, it should be smooth.
  3. Put the dough in plastic wrap and in the fridge for 30-60min.
  4. Pre-heat the oven to 200°C.
  5. Add flour to the work space and flatten the dough with a roll and make little pieces in whatever shapes you want (I used a small glass to make them round), thickness is best at 2-3mm. imo.
  6. Put them on a baking paper, or a clean tray with butter/oil, and bake them for 10min. Keep an eye on them, they should be golden.
McZfEuS.jpg
 
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Harborer of Hope

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They finally put a stop to all of mew's Japanese steakhouse's Dining IN places...Sooooo she's resorted to putting all those years of watching them cook her stuff in front of her to good use! Think mew got this chicken fried rice thing down~! Aaaand YouTube made the Yum Yum sauce Fun and Easy!! <3! Now when family is stuck in the house wiff mew, they slowly emerge from their lairs with their noses in the air like.....YYaaaaaas! Our little chef is making Nomz again! <3! 20191218_134424.jpg 20200127_214618.jpg
 

Talisien

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Moving this one over from the thread I started, just to keep cooking talk all in one place. What with the current situation, we could probably all use a few new recipes in our repertoire.

Taco Salad
1 lb ground beef / minced beef
1 16 ounce bag Doritos
1 lb shredded lettuce
4 ounces shredded carrot
4 ounces diced or grated onion
16 ounces grated mild cheddar
8 ounces medium salsa
8 ounces diced tomato (two medium to large tomatoes, cut into 1/4" chunks)
6 ounces sliced black olives

1.) Brown the beef in large, non-stick skillet or frying pan.
2.) Add onion to beef; cook until translucent.
3.) Add salsa to mixture of beef and onion. Simmer 8 minutes, or until moisture has mostly cooked off and meat+salsa mix is thick enough to leave a clear line when a spoon is drawn across the pan.
4.) In a large serving bowl, toss lettuce, cheddar, Doritos, tomatoes, and olives.
5.) Toss mix of meat + salsa into bowl with lettuce, tomato, olive, and cheddar.

Serve in bowls, with sour cream and hot sauce available as toppings to be served to taste. (And, if you must, avocado... But not on MY table, lol!)
 

Talisien

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Roasted Curry Cauliflower


Ingredients:
1 large head of cauliflower
3 garlic cloves
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
Kosher salt to taste
chopped cilantro (optional)


Directions:
1.) Preheat oven to 450.
2.) In a small bowl, mix the turmeric, cumin, and crushed red pepper flakes.
3.) Cut the cauliflower into 1-inch pieces and place into a large bowl.
4.) Pour the olive oil over the cauliflower.
5.) Press, grate, or fine-dice the garlic (your choice, as long as it is in very tiny pieces.) Sprinkle over the cauliflower.
6.) Toss the cauliflower and garlic until they are well-coated with the olive oil.
7.) While still tossing, sprinkle the seasoning from (Step 2). Continue to toss and sprinkle until all the vegetables are coated.
8.) Spread onto a large, rimmed baking sheet and bake for 20-25 minutes, until fully cooked but still medium-firm.
9.) Remove from oven.
10.) When serving, sprinkle with Kosher salt and- if desired- cilantro.




Variations:

For more variety, try adding diced onion (white or yellow is best for taste, but red looks nicer); the small tomato of your choice (grape, cherry, or yellow heirloom varieties are tasty and look nice); large-diced chunks of green bell pepper add some zest; . Simply toss them in the bowl anywhere between (Step 2) and (Step 6).

For more complex additons that (if you use a couple of them) could bring this up from a side dish to a main course, consider sweet potatoes, yams, pumpkin, acorn squash, or butternut squash. These will require some extra cooking, though, as they take far longer to bake than cauliflower. I suggest cutting them into bite-sized cubes and boiling for about 8-12 minutes, or microwaving while tightly covered for the same period in a bowl with a small amount of water. You want the pieces to be roughly fork-tender before entering the oven, so that they simply need to brown up a bit. These pieces are added in between (Step 2) to (Step 6), so they get tossed in the oil and spices.

If you don’t have fresh garlic, it can be swapped with 2 teaspoons of granulated garlic, or 3/4 teaspoon of garlic powder.

If you don’t have olive oil, you can use any other oil with a smoke point that is the same or higher. Coconut oil and avocado oil are popular choices; I don’t reccommend peanut oil, though, as it will not cook down enough in the short time this dish is in the oven.

As little additions, things to try include: a sprinkle of pine nuts, sunflower seeds (shells removed, of course!), or your favourite croutons as you serve.

For a more interesting texture, you can use finishing salt instead of Kosher salt; it has the same flavor, but adds some small bits of crunchy texture to each bite. (This is also sometimes known as flake salt.)

A squeeze of fresh lime across the top of a serving makes an excellent addition, particularly if you’re one of those who likes cilantro.
 

Talisien

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Coffee Marinade


Estimated total cooking time (including prep): 15 minutes
Batch size: ½ gallon
Recommended usage: marinates 3-10 pounds of meat, depending on cut and marinating method


Ingredients:
16 ounces strongly-brewed coffee, cooled
12 ounces molasses
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
2 tablespoons dijon mustard
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated
6-8 sprigs fresh thyme
¼ cup soy sauce

Directions:

Thoroughly mix all ingredients in a large container that can be tightly sealed. Refrigerate overnight to allow flavors to blend thoroughly.


Storage:
Refrigerate in a tightly sealed container. Will keep for up to 14 days.



Recommended Use:
Designed primarily as a marinade for lamb and pork; however, also makes a fine marinade for chicken, tofu, and an excellent marinade for aubergine (eggplant.) Meat can be marinated for a minimum of one hour, but not more than 24 hours; tofu should marinate for 2-8 hours; aubergine (eggplant) should marinate for at least one hour, but no more than 4 hours or it will become soggy.


Notable modifications:
By using the proper replacement soy sauce, this marinade can be made both vegan and glutein-free.
 
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